Give your sender information another thought

All elements of your email marketing are important. You contact only takes a few seconds to decide whether he will read your email. According to Epsilon about 65 per cent of the potential readers take a look at the sender address to decide whether or not they read the email.

Another American company, Return Path did its own research and found that 55 per cent of Internet users the email undoubtedly open if they know the sender. Therefore, it’s important to think carefully about the sender address. It actually consists of two parts. The first is the ‘display name’ that most email clients display. On the other hand there is the ‘reply address’ where reactions are sent to. A good email platform allows you to fill them out separately. And what should you take into account then?

Familiar name

Make sure there is a clear link between the subscription and your return address. Use a name that the reader knows. Therefore it is important that you contact already encountered that name during the opt-in procedure. Often the name of your company or your website. Generic names as editors, news or service mean nothing.

Avoid names of people

A receiver knows your company or your product. An employee is a noble stranger to him. Moreover some profiles in your company change jobs a lot or change their function in the company. And then suddenly another name will appear as the sender. Not very favourable when you finally encouraged a reader to trust your sender address. Use familiar names like representatives of the company, or the company name.

Not too long

Although the user interface of the various (web-based) email clients differ, you shouldn’t count too hard on the fact that the sender address gets lots of space on the screen. You better limit yourself in the number of characters. Experience shows that 20 characters, including the @, is the maximum. If you want more, make sure that the essence – read the recognisability – is in the front.

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